Can I ask a really dumb question?

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newyorkcityholic
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Can I ask a really dumb question?

Postby newyorkcityholic » Fri Oct 17, 2008 12:17 pm

Ok so I know Blu-Ray is the super cool new thing but what makes it so much better than DVDs? Isnt a Blu-Ray disc like a DVD? I just don't see what is so awesome about these? Can you play DVDs on these?

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Eddyisgreat
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Postby Eddyisgreat » Fri Oct 17, 2008 12:28 pm

These don't really do blu-ray justice but...yes you can play DVD's on a blu ray disk player (as far as I know) and there are a number of additional features the BD standard offers.

Image
DVD

Image
Blu-Ray Pure HD

Think of it this way. Even back to the early film days , movies shot on firm were always superior to the medium they come out in, and thats still the truth today. True, digital is easier to work with than film (in some cases), but films detail and overall resolution is so huge that vhs/dvd/bd are only capable of display a fraction of what the original scene was shot at, so during editing it is edited (today) on high powered machines (such as avid or autodesk all in one systems, or even on hardcore desktop products such as apple's final cut or adobe's premiere. A number of effects are done in After Effects). Before it reaches us its put into a much low resolution format since we don't have to hardware to display it (yet).

Edit: lol no hotlinking for me :( there is the original article http://www.zonadvd.com/modules.php?name=Sections&op=viewarticle&artid=710
Last edited by Eddyisgreat on Fri Oct 17, 2008 12:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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killasnake
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Postby killasnake » Fri Oct 17, 2008 12:30 pm

You can, you cannot play blue ray on a regular dvd player.

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MikesTooLz
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Postby MikesTooLz » Fri Oct 17, 2008 1:24 pm

The disc itself dosnt really have much to do with how the movie will look. The differance between the two discs is this.

A normal DVD can hold up to 8.5GB of information.
An HD-DVD can hold up to 45GB of information (HD-DVD is on its way out, stores that used to sell HD-DVD are not any more)
A blue-ray disc can hold up to 50GB of information.


With DVD the movie was compressed to fit on the disc. With blue-ray they dont have to compress the video as much to get it to fit on the disc. This in turn allows for better quality video and High definition requires a lot more storage space on the disc.

Also remember that not all movies were filmed in HD, so you may get an older movie on blue-ray that has the same quality as a normal DVD.(but the blueray cost a lot more)
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KristopherWindsor
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Postby KristopherWindsor » Fri Oct 17, 2008 3:13 pm

Blueray is overrated. While it is a technical achievement, and you'll notice the higher resolution when you pause the movie, it won't really improve your movie experience. I wouldn't recommend a Blueray player until the movies are the same price as DVD.
Upgrading from VHS to DVD was huge because soon movies were all over the computer, but Blueray just gives some more pixels.

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Vetterin
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Postby Vetterin » Fri Oct 17, 2008 4:26 pm

Don't foget about the sound quality as it will be greatly improved with Dolby TrueHD. Just remember that the most important componant is still an HD TV.

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packers
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Postby packers » Fri Oct 17, 2008 5:25 pm

Blue Ray = High Def, Regular DVD = standard def. Blue Ray is awesome if you have a HDTV. Buy a PS3, then you have an awesome gaming system to watch your Blue Rays on. We rent our Blue Rays from Netflix, but if you buy them the week they are released they are much cheaper, or watch for them on sale. Amazon has good prices on Blue Ray. Once you watch a movie with lots of action (Iron Man!) on Blue Ray you will understand the hype... :lol:

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VerbalI11-23
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Postby VerbalI11-23 » Fri Oct 17, 2008 7:04 pm

MikesTooLz wrote:The disc itself dosnt really have much to do with how the movie will look. The differance between the two discs is this.

A normal DVD can hold up to 8.5GB of information.
An HD-DVD can hold up to 45GB of information (HD-DVD is on its way out, stores that used to sell HD-DVD are not any more)
A blue-ray disc can hold up to 50GB of information.


With DVD the movie was compressed to fit on the disc. With blue-ray they dont have to compress the video as much to get it to fit on the disc. This in turn allows for better quality video and High definition requires a lot more storage space on the disc.

Also remember that not all movies were filmed in HD, so you may get an older movie on blue-ray that has the same quality as a normal DVD.(but the blueray cost a lot more)


i thought hd-dvd was like 15gb (dual is 40gb) and reg blue ray is like 25 (dual layer is 50gb/ only game that used this was mgs4 lol), where you getting your info haha. hd-dvd is already dead.

the blue ray disc could definitely hold more video/audio data so you'll get way better sound and if you saw hd vs sd video you'll recognize the difference right away, but hd audio/video requires that you have the right equipment or else they won't look that much different than dvd. so if you are a video/audiophile then you'll definitely want the blue ray, but if you're just a casual movie viewer i would say skip blue ray as most people probably jump on it as a bandwagon and they don't know anything about it haha....i would just go to the theaters as they have superior equipment anyways, that is unless you have a 50' tv and 7.1 surround and such then go for it.

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packers
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Postby packers » Sat Oct 18, 2008 7:31 am

Verbal_Intercourse11.23 wrote:
MikesTooLz wrote:i would just go to the theaters as they have superior equipment anyways, that is unless you have a 50' tv and 7.1 surround and such then go for it.


This is how I justify the cost of Blue Ray. I don't go to the theater. I got a nice TV and surround sound (with a deal of course) and for the cost of going to the movie I can generally buy more than one Blue Ray. Movie theaters charge too much and then you have to sit and listen to people talking, coughing, and annoying you. Watching it at home is much better.

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XmasDVD
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Postby XmasDVD » Sat Oct 18, 2008 7:51 am

All good information. Yeah I am not a hyper person who has to have the newest of everything. DVD is fine for ue - we have a 37" HDTV and HD signal so TV shows are great and DVDs are fine too.

sn1per420
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Postby sn1per420 » Sat Oct 18, 2008 1:05 pm

If you've got an HDTV at home, I highly recommend getting a blu-ray player. There is definitely a difference in picture quality between DVD and blu-ray when you're watching on an HDTV, and if you've got a surround sound system at home, the sound quality is drastically improved. I suspect that most people who claim to see no difference between blu-ray and DVD either don't have HDTVs at home, or are sitting too far away from their TVs to benefit from the increased resolution. (For an HDTV, ideal sitting distance is 1.5x to 2x the TV's size away. For example, for a 32" TV, the ideal distance would be between 48" and 64" away from the TV.)

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NeoJew
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Postby NeoJew » Sat Oct 18, 2008 3:36 pm

Old movies can be in HD too. The film they're shot on is much higher quality than 1080p, so if you have the original film you can rip it in HD.

sn1per420
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Postby sn1per420 » Sat Oct 18, 2008 3:45 pm

NeoJew wrote:Old movies can be in HD too. The film they're shot on is much higher quality than 1080p, so if you have the original film you can rip it in HD.
While this is true (in fact, film is an analog format, so it technically has an infinite resolution), some old films have physically degraded over the years, and so HD transfers don't end up looking too good.

Adamixoye
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Postby Adamixoye » Sat Oct 18, 2008 9:11 pm

sn1per420 wrote:
NeoJew wrote:Old movies can be in HD too. The film they're shot on is much higher quality than 1080p, so if you have the original film you can rip it in HD.
While this is true (in fact, film is an analog format, so it technically has an infinite resolution), some old films have physically degraded over the years, and so HD transfers don't end up looking too good.


Film is not purely analog, because it still has a "grain" to it. Light causes chemical reactions in the film, and the affected area is of a finite size. Also, the lens has a limiting resolution---this limit is an analog one, so it doesn't cause pixelation or graininess, but it still results in something far less than infinite resolution.

The point about degradation is a good one, though. Similarly, for some films there is no longer an original. This is a problem for old TV shows on DVD, too---some will never have a complete set because episodes have been lost.

sn1per420
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Postby sn1per420 » Sun Oct 19, 2008 2:08 am

Adamixoye wrote:Film is not purely analog, because it still has a "grain" to it. Light causes chemical reactions in the film, and the affected area is of a finite size. Also, the lens has a limiting resolution---this limit is an analog one, so it doesn't cause pixelation or graininess, but it still results in something far less than infinite resolution.

The point about degradation is a good one, though. Similarly, for some films there is no longer an original. This is a problem for old TV shows on DVD, too---some will never have a complete set because episodes have been lost.
This is true, I was just referring to movies that weren't that old. If you go old enough, then between film degradation and old recording equipment, you won't be able to get the kind of quality blu-ray was made for.


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